Episode #1

What if a fluffy missile wants to watch TV?

— Starring &

2017

Credits

Curator - Jan Boelen
Graphic Designer - Orlando Lovell
Music Composer - Arnaud Pujol
Designer - Jing He
Designer - Hannah Van Luttervelt

Design Academy Eindhoven
Frans Hals Museum

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Tulip Pyramid

Designer - Jing He

The Tulip Pyramid is a 17th-century Dutch invention. However, its form, its motifs and its material imitate Chinese porcelain and pagoda. I began this project to continue the process of replicating and transforming which is the history of Tulip Pyramid. I wanted to explore the question of ‘creativity in copying’ and the question of identity. If a Tulip Pyramid were to be imitated in nowadays China - a country which is a mixture of common and private ownership, of collectivism and individualism, troubled by the issue of counterfeiting and appropriating intellectual property - what would result be? I invited five young Chinese designers from different design disciplines, to reflect the culture and the history of imitation and innovation. They each designed two layers of the pyramid. I claim ownership of the final product together with these five designers, to further explore the intellectual property of this object. I see myself as a Tulip Pyramid. My origins are in China and I’ve been transformed in the Netherlands. What does that make me? The education in the Netherlands gave me another perspective of design. I found a flexible area outside the practice of design for mass-production, using my personal experience to ask questions about mass-production in a design discourse. For a second pyramid, I imitated and mixed up famous Dutch designers’ iconic works with my former works, to question their influence and the institution that formed me. Graduation is the starting point of this long term project. I expect that in the future, this project will keep growing and develop into mass-production.

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Playing with weapons

Designer - Hannah Van Luttervelt

They look cute and cuddly. But look again and you’ll see them for what they are: bombs, missiles and mortars. As toy guns are popular as ever, I thought it's time to make the next step with these toys of mass destruction. Although they are made from soft wool, the shape and size are for real. The biggest of them all is a stuffed replica of the nuke on Hiroshima, which ironically was nicknamed ‘Little Boy’. Could the contradiction be any more obvious? A short accompanying movie shows how politicians play with their bombs like boys with their toys. Isn’t it time to stop this madness?

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